F1 Tech Review: How Ferrari Fell Short After Getting on Top

Ferrari mounted another assault on the Formula 1 World Championship in 2018, and while it looked to have got the better of Mercedes in the opening phases, its title aspirations fell agonizingly short of the target once again.

Not only did Mercedes get on top of its own issues, Ferrari’s technical updates faltered in the latter stages of the season. That said, at least the Scuderia innovated throughout the season and kept up its development rate – which had previously been a deficiency – right the way through its title tilt.

Join us as we take a look back through this year’s technical imagery…

 

Ferrari SF71H steering wheel

Ferrari SF71H steering wheel

 

A fantastic illustration of the SF71-H’s steering wheel, in which we can see the various buttons, toggles and rotaries that the driver has at his disposal in order to make changes to the power unit.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H nose detail

Ferrari SF71H nose detail

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

 

A close up of the SF71-H’s ‘S’-duct inlet, which you’ll note features several divisions.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H aero detail

Ferrari SF71H aero detail

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

 

A close up of the SF71-H’s turning vanes, note that the two forward-most elements are mounted on the underside of the nose, while the rearward elements are attached to the chassis.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H front suspension detail

Ferrari SF71H front suspension detail

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

 

Without the vanity panel we can see some of the various components that make up the SF71-H’s front suspension.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H floor

Ferrari SF71H floor

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

 

An amazingly detailed illustration of the SF71-H’s floor, note the revised splitter extension (older specification inset).

 

 

Ferrari SF71H aero detail

Ferrari SF71H aero detail

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

 

A close up of the three strakes mounted on the leading edge of the SF71-H’s floor responsible for tidying up andre-energising the airflow.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H rear wing detail

Ferrari SF71H rear wing detail

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

 

A close up of the SF71-H’s rear wing strakes and the outer corner of the diffuser.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H floor

Ferrari SF71H floor

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

 

The SF71-H featured a concave section in the floor above the diffuser that was used to channel airflow around the car’s coke-bottle region, gearbox and crash structure more effectively.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H diffuser extra exit

Ferrari SF71H diffuser extra exit

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

 

Another view of the channels created either side of the car’s rear crash structure.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H sidepods, Australian GP

Ferrari SF71H sidepods, Australian GP

 

 

A great side view of the cockpit region, showing the winged halo fairing two-piece mirrors and upper side pod inlet. 

 

 

Ferrari SF71H diffuser detail

Ferrari SF71H diffuser detail

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

 

A close up of the outer corner of the diffuser and the various flaps that surround it.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H brake discs

Ferrari SF71H brake discs

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

 

This illustration of the front brake assembly without the brake drum on gives us a better understanding of what goes on under the skin.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H rear wheel hub and brake detail

Ferrari SF71H rear wheel hub and brake detail

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Sutton Images

 

A great shot from the garage of the rear brake assembly without the brake drum attached. This gives us a better view of the internals, including the pipework used to cool the caliper.

 

 

Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF71H

 Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari SF71H

Photo by: Andrew Hone / LAT Images

 

The SF-71H laden with kiel probe arrays as the team looked to gather data during the pre-season tests.

 

 

Ferrari SF71H rear wing

Ferrari SF71H rear wing

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

 

The team utilized a spoon-shaped rear wing for the Azerbaijan GP, as it looked to reduce drag but also retain a decent chunk of downforce for the trickier second sector.